AUSTIN 7 JOURNALS
THE MAGAZINE OF THE AUSTIN 7 CLUB OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC
JULY 2014 VOLUME 209
ENJOY THE WINTERTIME IN YOUR AUSTIN 7
These titles plus many more motoring books are available for loan or for browsing
from the Austin 7 Club Library, see Barry Pannell, our Librarian
Austin 7 Journals
Page 2
July 2014
AUSTIN 7 CLUB OF S.A. INC
2014 COMMITTEE
PRESIDENT:
RALPH DRAGE,
EDITOR, A7 Journals: DAVID SEARLES,
Ph: 8251 2637 or 0418 846 082
Ph: 8445 1444 or 0408 700 047
email: [email protected]
email: [email protected]
The Austin 7 Journals is published quarterly by the
SECRETARY:
GRAHAM BUESNEL,
club and is available on the club web site and at
Ph: 8449 4764 or 0438 794 979
meetings in January, April, July and October. Items
email:[email protected]
for inclusion of each issue closes at the end of the
previous month.
TREASURER:
LAURIE SUTTON,
Ph: 8358 3421 or: 0418 831 974
CAMS Delegate:
TONY MORGAN,
email: [email protected]
Ph: 8264 7179 email: [email protected]
ASST SECRETARY:
LIBRARIAN:
BARRY PANNELL,
MALCOLM LAKE,
Ph: 8255 1371 email: [email protected]
The library is open at Monthly Club Meetings. Books
ASST TREASURER
may be borrowed or browsed.
RON SCHACHE,
Conditional Registration Inspectors &
COMPETITION SECRETARY
Authorised Officers
BRETT WATTERS
Scott Appleyard: Southern Metro
REGISTRAR & LOG BOOKS
Ph: 0427 243 879
GEOFF STEPHENS,
Wolf Semler: Southern Vales.
Ph: 8556 6405
Ph: 8365 1343 (H) or 0437 061 569
email: [email protected]
Trevor Clerke: Yorke Peninsula.
Ph: 0428 851 139
SPARES MANAGER & Vice President:
Geoff Stephens; All areas.
Ph: 0437 061 569
DAVID GREAR,
Ralph Drage: All areas.
Ph: 8296 1689 email: [email protected]
Ph: 8251 2637 or 0418 846 082
The Austin 7 Spares Shed is open prior to Monthly
Graham Buesnel North Western Suburbs.
Club Meetings, Austin 7 Technical Nights and other
Ph: 0438 794 979
times as notified by the Manager.
TOURING:
RICK HOFFMAN,
THE AUSTIN 7 CLUB OF S.A. INC IS
Ph: 8325 3776 or: 0408 898 736
AFFILIATED WITH:
email: [email protected]
CONFEDERATION OF AUSTRALIAN MOTOR
SPORT, and
TOURING:
BILL GOWER,
Ph: 8524 6029 or: 0457 157 494
FEDERATION OF HISTORIC MOTORING CLUBS
email: [email protected]
SA INC.
PROPERTY
ALAN BAKER,
FINANCIAL: The Club is able to accept payment
Ph: 8261 1175 or 0437 428 543
of subscriptions, for events or fees by Internet
email:[email protected]
Banking. Banking details are: BSB 085-333 A/c
Working Bees to maintain the property are held on
838545354. When transferring funds to the Club
an "as required basis". Members will be advised of
please quote your name or a reference so that the
any working bee planned at a meeting prior or by
Treasurer is able to identify your payment.
email.
All correspondence to:
The Secretary
AUSTIN 7 CLUBROOMS: 262 TAPLEYS HILL ROAD, SEATON 5023
Annual subscriptions Full: $65.00: Associate/Remote: $32.50
The Austin 7 Club SA Internet Address is www.austin7clubsa.com.au
Austin 7 Journals
Page 3
July 2014
Austin 7
Journals
Volume 209
July 2014
PRESIDENT’S PREAMBLE
An unfortunate incident occurred at the clubrooms during a recent Technical Night meeting.
One of our long standing members momentarily collapsed. After picking himself up he
vehemently declared to those around him that he was fine. He stayed for the duration of the
meeting, then, as heading for home, and not more than 2km from the clubrooms, he collapsed
again. Luckily he was not seriously injured nor did he not injure anyone else, but his car was a
write off., He was taken to hospital where he stayed for a couple of days.
As a result of this incident, the committee agreed that should any one (member or otherwise)
collapse at any club function, an ambulance is to be called so they can assess what they think
should happen to the person. This agreement has been added to the club's By-Laws.
The TV advert that the TTM group had made to promote our Modern Regularity events has
been aired on channel 44 over the past few weeks. Whilst it is too early to assess the impact
of the advert, the number of entries at the recent Modern Regularity events has been
pleasing. The newly introduced Mentoring program for new entrants has proved to be
beneficial. A big thank you must go to the TTM group for continuing to look for ways to
improve and promote the sport.
In recent months there have been some very good day runs, some of which have been
lacking in participants. I would like to remind members that, regardless of your interest in the
club, you are all most welcome to attend these types of events. You don’t need to own, or
bring on the day, an old car, but you'll be welcome in whatever type of vehicle you drive. To
those who haven’t been on a club day run, I encourage you to make the effort and join us in
the near future. It will give you the opportunity to meet and socialize with other like minded
people and go to, or see some things you may not have seen before. Also, if you have a
historic vehicle, it will give you a reason to use it. As the old saying goes - use it or lose it.
As always the Touring Coordinators are continually looking for things of interest to include in
the day runs that are held every month. If you think you know of something that may be of
interest to others, please let Rick Hoffman or Bill Gower know.
I would like you to join me in welcoming the following new members & wish them a long &
enjoyable time within the club.
Richard BAILEY
Kristen BAILEY
Brett BURNISTOW
David CLAIR
Frank GROSSER
Shane HUNT
Michael KEMERY
Ryan KENNEDY
Jackson LOMAS
Thomas LYNCH
Paul MARTIN
Ashley SANDERSON
Jeffrey WATSON
To any member who is currently on the sick list, I wish you a speedy recovery.
Ralph Drage
President
Austin 7 Journals
Page 4
July 2014
COMING EVENTS
22 Day 1 Adelaide Electric
Austin 7 Club of S.A.
23 Day 2 Southern Tour
24 Day 3 Barossa Magic
Inc.2014 Calendar
25 Day 4 Major Berthold Delacroix's Death
25 Day 4 Uncle Arthur's Film Night
26 Day 5 City to Bay Veteran Run
27 Day 6 Motorfest Chat Time
28 Bay to Birdwood Run
29 Day 8 Meet Miss Stuart & Friends
30 Day 9 Plains & Planes of Mallala
October 2014
July 2014
1 Day 10 Cricket & Football Get Together
14 Monthly Club Meeting
2.Day 11 Put it on the Slate
20 Social Day Run (Hills Luncheon at
3 Day 12 Come Fly With Me
Currency Creek Winery)
Federation Motorfest 2014 concludes.
22 Leisure Run to the Belair Hotel.
5 Vintage Hillclimb Collingrove
28 A7C Technical Night
13 Monthly Club Meeting which tonight
includes the RAA giving a talk entitled
August 2014
"Years Ahead". It is a lifestyle and road
10 Modern Regularity R5 at Mallala Motor
safety presentation targeting mature
Sport Park
members which most of us have either
11 Monthly Club Meeting 8pm at the
achieved or rapidly approaching. 8pm at
clubrooms, please bring plate of supper to
the clubrooms, please bring plate of supper
share.
to share.
16/17 Race Meeting—Mallala
19 Social Day Run. To Hindmarsh Island.
17 Social Day Run which today is a
21 Leisure Run, looking at the Normanville
breakfast run commencing at Newton and
Hotel.
travelling via the City ,the Superway, Port
26 Modern Regularity R7 at Mallala Motor
Expressway, Outer Harbour and ending up
Sport Park.
at the Largs Pier Hotel in time for a hearty
27 A7C Technical Night.
breakfast. Run sheet at clubrooms.
19 Leisure Run at the Aldgate Pump Hotel
November 2014
25 A7C Technical Night
1 Race Meeting—Mallala
29 Quarterly Luncheon at the Royal Hotel,
10 Monthly Club Meeting
8pm at the
Kent Town.
clubrooms, please bring plate of supper to
share.
September 2014
16 Social Day Run - bring your dog along
1 Old Car Day.
to this doggie day run
8 Monthly Club Meeting & AGM 8pm at the
15/16 Bendigo Swap Meet.
clubrooms, please bring plate of supper to
18 Leisure Run, perhaps the Hahndorf Mill.
share.
22 Subs & Rego Day at Clubrooms.
13/14 Caravan Capers at the Kapunda
24 A7C Technical Night & Run.
Tourist Park.
28 Quarterly Luncheon at the Brighton
16 Leisure Run, planned for the Middleton
Metro Hotel (Charlies).
Hotel with Protea World as the morning tea
stop.
December 2014
21 Modern Regularity R6 at Mallala Motor
7 Modern Regularity R8 at Mallala Motor
Sport Park
Sport Park.
22 A7C Technical Night.
8 Monthly Club Meeting.
9 Leisure Run possibly the Oakbank Hotel.
Federation Motorfest 2014 starts:
14 Subs & Rego Day.
Details at the clubrooms:
14 Christmas Function
Austin 7 Journals
Page 5
July 2014
GEOFF STEPHENS
K G B Car Audio Services Pty Ltd
22 O.G. Road Klemzig S.A. 5087
* Car Audio
* Car Radio Repairs
* Alarms
* Immobilisers
* Hands Free Kits
* Central Locking
* Speed Alert
* Cruise Control
Phone: 8266 1488
Mobile: 0437 061 569
Fax: 8266 1588
Special Discounts to Austin 7 Club members
For the attention of members who have historic vehicles!
DO YOU HAVE A HISTORIC VEHICLE CONDITIONALLY
REGISTERED THROUGH THE AUSTIN 7 CLUB?
If so, annually, you must sign a Statutory Declaration in front of a JP stating
that your vehicle has not suffered any modification from both the original
inspection MR334 and the conditions set out in the Code of Practice. (C of P
available from the clubrooms). The Club will not update an existing or issue
you with a new Log Book unless the Statutory Declaration is produced to the
Club Registrar.
Members are advised that if your log book is not kept up to date with your
current membership and annual statutory declaration, your historic vehicle is
not driveable on the road, even though the registration may not have expired.
Members must pay their club subscription before 31 December each year to
ensure continuity of membership and ability to drive their historic vehicle.
When renewing your registration and after payment, endorse the receipt
number in the space provided on the Registration Certificate before the Club
Registrar stamps the Certificate with the Austin 7 Club stamp.
Your Vehicle must be inspected by a Club Authorised officer once in a three
year period. This will ideally be done at the issue of a new log book.
The Club requests that you carry out any Austin 7 log book business at the
many opportunities available at the Clubrooms.
Please do your part to preserve the integrity of this conditional registration system we
are privileged to have through our Austin 7 Club.
Club regalia for sale:
The club has a variety of items of interest to members which are available from the Treasurer
each meeting at the clubrooms.
Austin 7 Club Decal small:
$1.00
Austin 7 Club Decal large
$2.00
Austin script hat/lapel badge:
$3.00
Austin 7 Club Cap
$12.50
Austin 7 Club Hat
$12.50
Austin 7 Club Badge Metal Radiator
$22.00
Austin 7 Club 50th year history book:
$20.00
Austin 7 Short Sleeve Yellow & Blue top:
$20.00
Austin 7 Short Sleeve Dark Blue 3 button top
$30.00 sizes in stock M,L, & XL.
Austin 7 Long Sleeve Polar Fleece Jumpers:
$45.00 sizes in stock S,M,L & XL.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 7
July 2014
The Austin 7 Club SA Inc is now on Facebook, search
for Austin 7 Club of South Australia
Austin 7 Journals
Page 8
July 2014
Lakeside Nissan of
1195 Main North Road, Pooraka SA
5095 has offered a
sponsorship deal with the Austin 7 Club of SA Inc for the Modern Regularity Series
the Club to be conducted at Mallala Motor Sport Park during 2014.
As mentioned in the above offer, Lakeside Nissan will donate to the Austin 7 Club
$150 per vehicle purchased from now until 31 December 2014.
=======000000======
WANTED - Austin A30, 1 x 13 inch rim in good condition, don't need tyre.
Needed for a spare".
phone Russell Vine 8281 9151 or 0401 900 615
Austin 7 Journals
Page 9
July 2014
220 Main North Road Prospect SA 5082
Autoglass Replacement & Repairs
Tinting Cars
Glass Cut
Insurance work billed direct
All major cards accepted
RAA Members Welcome
Austin 7 Club Members Welcome
Lindsay Dean
Mob 0408 269 444
Ph 08 8269 4444 Fax 08 8269 5537
Austins Over Australia - Devonport Tasmania 3rd to 6th April 2015
You should have all received the AOA 2015 Rally entry forms last month and please, now is
the time to send in your entries rather than later, as this allows the planning committee more
time to organise the AOA Rally.
The SPIRIT of TASMANIA bookings are now open and you may book online or by phone.
You will need to have on hand
- Dates for travel
- Vehicle registration number
- Vehicle length and height
For online bookings go to Spirit of Tasmania website:
http://www.spiritoftasmania.com.au/austins-over-australia-2015-rally/
For phone bookings call 1800 884 305 and ask for AOA 2015 Rally group bookings.
Return fares start from $366 including your Austin
Accommodation can be sourced in the Devonport area and to book you will need to phone
the Devonport Visitor Centre Coordinator, Anne-Maree Snell. Her number is 03 6424 4466, or
you can email [email protected] and mark to the attention of Anne-Maree Snell.
Again, I advise that you make you bookings early as it is a busy time of the year and
accommodation availability will be limited.
Parking in Melbourne for your tow vehicle and trailer has been arranged with a transport
company in the Altona area. A parking form will be sent out to all rally entries with the
meals/regalia forms in about four months’ time.
Wally Nye (Secretary)
Ph. 03 5968 9760
If going to this event please advise David Grear of your pending attendance.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 10
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
OBSERVATION RUN - SUNDAY 16 MARCH 2014
After experiencing some rainy days prior to the day of the observation run I was
concerned that I would need to delete some of the questions on the day. However, I
spoke to the man upstairs & he gave us some really nice weather on the day.
At the designated time 11 cars were lined up in the car park at Drage Reserve,
Felixstow, ready to participate in the Observation run. The instructions were handed
to each participant, their speedo and departure time was recorded and then the cars
were released at 3 minute intervals, so they couldn’t follow one another.
No road names were mentioned on the instruction sheets, only “TR at TJ” or “TL at
4th” corner type instructions, along with some cryptic clues like
“Keep the
Campbelltown Memorial Oval on your left for as long as possible” which required
turning left from Darley Rd onto Lower North East Rd. There were 46 questions
along the 55 km route which required an answer. As I understand it, several
entrants saw other entrants along the way & weren’t sure how they got there or why
they were going in a different direction.
After leaving the Felixstow car park, the route went via several back streets to
Paradise, then, after a few detours, went up Anstey Hill to Paracombe, then onto
Upper Hermitage before winding thru Wynn Vale then back to Drage Reserve at
Felixstow.
Rick & I waited at the start / finish for any late comers or early returners. At about
11.30 we were joined by a few other club members who had come to have lunch with
us and soak up some of the atmosphere from the participants.
About 2 hours after the first car left, cars started to arrive back at the start/finish.
Unfortunately the first 3 cars to return had not completed the course; they got part
way thru and then got very lost. Luckily they found their way back to the
start/finish.
Not long after, the successful entrants started to return. The first question Marie
asked them was “Are you still speaking to each other”. Many of the responses said
thru heavy laughter cannot be published. Their speedo reading was recorded and
they all got ready to have lunch.
When all entrants had returned & many had completed their lunch, each entrant
passed their answer sheets to one of the other entrant. The answer to each question
was then confirmed before the sheets were tallied.
Brenton & Cyndy Spangler were the only ones to answer every question correctly.
They also travelled the least distance and completed the course in the least amount
of time.
I would like to thank Bill & Veronica Gower who did the initial test run for me &
Geoff & Bronwyn Stephens for doing a final run check the week before the event to
ensure nothing had changed.
I am sure that all entrants found the route challenging but really enjoyed the
experience. It was great to see some members we don’t usually see on our normal
day runs participate in this event. Thank you all for making it a successful day.
Ralph Drage (event organiser)
Austin 7 Journals
Page 11
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
DAY RUN to WITTUNGA BOTANIC GARDEN VIA MCLAREN VALE on SUNDAY 20
APRIL 2014
On a beautiful Autumn day, a group of 17 Austineers met at the Victoria Hotel (Top
of Taps) in 8 cars - 1 Austin 7, 1 Austin A95, 1 HG Holden & 5 moderns. Amongst
the group was Barbara Grear who was recovering from her surprise 80th Birthday
the night before.
We left at 9.30 & headed for McLaren Vale via Clarendon. Along the way most cars
had to contend with a group of cyclist who were competing in a road race. As they
were 4 across on many sections of the winding & hilly roads it was impossible to
pass them safely. Thankfully, after several kilometres they went left & we went right.
Upon arrival in McLaren Vale, after having parked in a designated car park, Rick
opened the gates to one of our member’s, Davide Frada’s, workshop. Most of the
men went into the workshop where they saw a large number of European vehicles
either in the process of, or waiting to be refurbished. The ladies headed to the Menz
Chocolate outlet, which is on the same property as Davide’s workshop. As if we
needed more sweet stuff on Easter Sunday. We then went over the road to the
Almond train where a few of the group had a coffee.
At 11.30 we headed off to our lunch destination at Wittunga Botanic Gardens at
Blackwood, retracing our steps some of the way. It was such a pretty drive
especially as the autumn colours are on display & the county side is slowly greening
up. I think some cars took some alternative turns, but we all got back on track to
arrive at Botanic Gardens at about the same time.
We formed a circle of chairs on the grass where we sat & had our BYO lunch over a
lot of laughs. After lunch most of us went to investigate the duck pond which also
had quite a few turtles swimming around.
It was then time for every to head off home after having a lovely day with wonderful
weather, great friendship & no car troubles. We are so blessed to live where we do.
Thanks Rick for organising a great run & turning on the lovely weather.
Marie Drage
Austin 7 Journals
Page 12
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
ANTHONY VERNER CONQUERS THE MOUNTAIN - EASTER 2014
Anthony Verner’s smooth driving style paid off in spades at the Bathurst Motor
Festival
2014 held at Mount Panorama over Easter. Anthony and his VR V8
Commodore won the group two regularity event by a clear margin, an impressive
feat given that he was competing with about forty five NSW drivers with past
experience at the Mount Panorama circuit. “But it’s an automatic” was overheard a
number of times during the trophy presentations.
Austin 7 SA and Track Time Motorsport was represented by five members, Anthony
Verner - VR Commodore Senator, Brett Watters - Peugeot GTI 180, Colin Zygveld -
Ford FG GT, John Tiller - Mazda MX5, and me, Steve Conroy - Lx Torana.
I have dreamt of competing at Mount Panorama since viewing my first telecast of the
Hardie-Ferodo 500 in 1968 and it was definitely worth the forty five year wait. The
facilities are first rate and the circuit is just breathtaking. The track surface was
billiard table smooth, not a bump or pot hole to be found. My first lap was a leap
into the unknown. Heading across ‘Skyline’ I was thinking “what an amazing view,
but where’s the next corner?” The guys back at the pits asked me why hadn’t I been
using my Playstation to get to know the track. I had to tell them that I don’t have a
Playstation nor do I have the inclination to race virtually. There are a number of
blind corners and the surrounding concrete gives one a healthy respect for this
circuit.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 13
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Accreditation and scrutineering was completed on Thursday, and practice for
Groups one and two was on Good Friday. We only had one opportunity to predict
our lap time for the entire event so it was somewhat of a lucky dip for those that
hadn’t ever competed there. Brett Watters spent more than an hour checking and
re-checking his calculations with much chin rubbing.
The beautiful autumn weather continued on
Saturday. The nights were a very cold two degrees
but the days were all a mild nineteen degrees with
some light cloud. We had two twenty minute events
on Saturday although the time window could not be
extended if an incident caused yellow or red flags.
Kym Ninnes and his Clubman hit the wall at Reid
Park midway through the second group two event so
we only managed to complete about three laps. John
Tiller’s Mazda decided to dead lock it’s right hand
door so he had to resort to climbing over it to be
seated. It didn’t stop him doing some great sub three
minute lap times. I got a hell of a fright whilst
steaming down Conrod, I heard a voice telling me to
“turn back you’re going the wrong way”, my speedo
wasn’t working so I’d decided to use my GPS but I’d
forgotten to delete the last instruction to direct us to
our farm stay cabin.
Ground hog day weather continued on Sunday, two more events to finish the
weekend’s racing. Port Lincoln’s Hagen Zerk in his XA GT two-door Falcon was a
shoe-in for a podium finish running consistently 2:47 until his top loader input
shaft was sheared off, possibly a horse power issue, plenty there I think. Anthony
had nominated 3:03, he put down 3:03.2741, 3:03.1363, and a 3:04.0888 in a
reduced first event. I finally got to pass someone, a V8 Torana Hatch driven by
Stephen Lacey but he later told me that he couldn’t reach the pedals because his
seat adjuster failed and he nearly ended up in the back seat.
Bathurst is a well appointed large country town with some majestic old buildings.
There are many restaurants and hotels with a wide choice of good food at reasonable
prices. Noel (my pit manager) and I decided to try Kings Hotel on Thursday night. I
spied the Seafood Plate for $27.90. The waitress asked if I was sharing with my
mate. I said no “he can get his own”. The trouble was that the plate arrived so piled
high with seafood, chips and salad that I thought I’d missed ‘serves two’ on the
menu but no, it was for one.
It included:
1 x barramundi fillet
3 x kilpatrick oysters
1 x morton bay bug (I love these)
calamari rings
6 x prawns
chips (couldn’t eat all)
2 x black mussels
salad
2 x scallops
I have to admit that we returned to the Kings Hotel on Saturday night with Anthony
Verner and John & Christine Tiller. I starved myself during the day not to be beaten
by that Seafood Plate.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 14
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Brett and Sandy Watters kindly invited the A7 contingent to their rented farm house
on Sunday night. They put on a magnificent dinner which ended with our in-car
videos of the Mount Panorama circuit. It was a very pleasant end to a wonderful
weekend of camaraderie and motor sport.
Steve Conroy
TRACK TIME MOTORSPORT
a division of
Austin 7 Club of SA Inc.
The article (left) is courtesy of the July 2014 issue of the Two
Wells and Districts ECHO.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 15
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Pre War Austin 7 Run to Goolwa 25 to27 April 2014
We met at 9.00am at Price’s Bakery on North East Rd at Windsor Gardens and departed at
9.30 after coffee. Departure time was 9.00am but the Bakery only opened at 9.00 when they
saw us all in the car park waiting.
The group travelled through Inglewood, Gumeracha and Birdwood to Mount Pleasant where
we met up with Lee and John Sandford from Mildura in their '37 Ruby Sedan who had come
down to spend the weekend with us.
Each driver was then required to nominate an average speed that they would travel to our
next stop at Callington where Greg and Julie Lindsay would be waiting at the Callington oval
to clock in each car. Most drivers estimated between 32 and 38 miles per hour allowing for
stop signs and hills.
The Stephens family nominated 42 mph and roared off into the distance.
Who would win?
Who would be closest?
How fast do you really average in an Austin 7?
We will never know as Greg and Julie did not make it to Callington Oval before we did due to
smoke coming out from under the passenger seat. This problem was easily fixed by removing
the battery and running the car on the Magneto ignition for the weekend.
After regrouping at Callington we travelled to Strathalbyn for Lunch and then on to our Motel
in Goolwa. The Motel proprietor was rather confused when we requested a number of empty
cardboard boxes. It was explained that our cars have a habit of dripping oil and it is easier to
catch it rather than cleaning it up afterwards.
Tea was taken at the Corio Hotel where we were joined by some of our Southern members
Doug and Vivienne Hill, Chris Wright and Sarah, and Alf Hart and his wife.
Saturday started bright and sunny and then the weather deteriorated as we travelled to
Hindmarsh Island. The Bridge at Goolwa looks (and is) quite steep for an Austin 7 and down
to the Murray Mouth for a group photo of 13 Austin 7’s.
Morning tea was at Currency Creek Winery and then on to the Milang Bakery for Lunch.
We followed the river along through Clayton and Finniss and back to Goolwa
Ian Brock, who lives opposite the Motel, invited us over the road to view his collection
Saturday afternoon where he has his Elfin, the Nadger(Clubman) and a Mercedes coupe. Ian
started the Elfin and woke up the sleepy town of Goolwa from their afternoon nap.
Tea was at the Whistle Stop Café which was enjoyed by all.
Sunday Morning before we left for home, we visited Rob Vanderkamp's home in Goolwa to
view his collection of Falcon GT racecars.
The group then travelled back to Meadows which must now be the meeting place for car and
motorbike clubs on Sunday mornings as it was busy.
From Meadows the group dispersed and travelled back to either Hahndorf to search for Teddy
Bears, or back to Callington to search for where the smoke escaped from or back to Adelaide
via Clarendon.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 16
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
PAST EVENTS
To wind-up the Pre War Run to Goolwa we stopped at the Meadows Bakery for brunch
along with a large number of motorcyclists who often frequent the town on a Sunday.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 20
July 2014
Modern Regularity -
25 May 2014
Lakeside Nissan Trophy #3
Name
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
Total
5 Laps
4 Laps
6 Laps
5 Laps
3 Laps
23 Laps
1
Duane GENT
24
12
11
10
19
76
72
Anthony VERNER
50
14
20
11
22
117
36
Sandy WATTERS
22
36
18
16
28
120
89
Bruce MARSTON
51
24
18
21
13
127
71
Steve CONROY
23
23
41
35
9
131
77
Andrew BAOHM
38
11
56
13
26
144
58
Peter BOWDEN
51
38
28
23
10
150
91
Thomas WALKOM
55
33
44
22
1
155
8
Geoff STEPHENS
19
13
29
59
44
164
47
Jackson LOMAS
65
51
25
31
11
183
45
David MCDEED
30
52
56
25
22
185
67
Darryl BRIGG
42
8
48
50
38
186
69
Colin TUCKER
29
10
33
99
19
190
41
Robin GEORGE
52
44
25
13
82
216
49
Geoff BURDON
30
35
79
63
41
248
96
Paul SEIDEL
13
4
17
17
207
258
42
James FLEMING
30
145
46
66
11
298
34
Robert WANN
124
12
54
36
72
298
75
Lee SUMMERS
56
86
67
87
36
332
97
Robert EDWARDS
122
76
74
31
58
361
88
Richard BAILEY
30
39
34
54
207
364
61
John TILLER
50
33
45
29
207
364
24
Stephen DRURY
68
55
33
51
192
399
43
Brenton BAILEY
139
44
152
58
24
417
60
Russell PEARCE
84
34
127
52
207
504
90
Ashley SANDERSON
157
88
117
116
40
518
54
Dennis MCDEED
385
42
65
40
27
559
13
Tony TREWREN
54
24
102
363
207
750
95
Kristen BAILEY
88
203
86
363
19
759
7
Ben DE PALMA
114
32
208
257
207
818
11
Bronwyn STEPHENS
342
59
179
317
33
930
40
David ZOLLO
370
36
40
363
207
1016
95
Lauren BAILEY
449
188
223
163
39
1062
65
Tom FERGUSON
364
203
223
189
110
1089
50
Steve LANGFORD
434
203
56
348
207
1248
19
Peter WILLIAMS
279
203
223
363
207
1275
2
Darren DAVEY
449
203
223
363
207
1445
26
Brett WATTERS
449
203
223
363
207
1445
62
Dennis HALL
449
203
223
363
207
1445
64
Neville PHILIPS
449
203
223
363
207
1445
79
Noel HARRIS
449
203
223
363
207
1445
Scores in italics either DNS, DNF or did not nominate a time
DNF Score
denotes track record
449
203
223
363
207
Austin 7 Journals
Page 21
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
2014 SA/Vic Austin 7 Clubs Border Run 7/9 June
This year of 2014 represents 60 years of Border Runs since the inception of the
event in 1955. A small number of members from SA attended this event organised
by the Victorian Austin 7 Club. The venue was Stawell in Victoria some 200 Kms
east of the border. As a result Austin 7's
attending from here were few in number.
A couple of us left on Friday and travelled
via Wellington, lunching at the new
refurbished Courthouse Cafe, very nice!
We dropped in on Andrew & Debbie
Dawes home at Meningie and had a look
at their most recent purchase of a Ansair
Flxible Clipper which they will be using as
a mobile home, before overnighting at
Kingston.
Saturday morning a leisurely run via Naracoorte and Apsley where we picked up
Greg & Julie Lindsay from Casterton and Dean & Louise Tompkins from Millicent at
the Saturday cafe lunch stop just outside Apsley. Arrival at Stawell was about late
Saturday afternoon with most of the Victorian members already settled in.
The motel dining room was the venue for a bit of a happy hour followed by the
evening meal which was on the excellent side. Entertainment was provided during
the meal by a duet which normally provides entertainment to folk in nursing homes
and they lived up to their genre confirming that I never voluntarily want to see my
days out in a nursing home.
Sunday was bright and cool and after breakfast given route instructions and set off
following the car in front - not a good idea! The plan was to go to the only hill in
Stawell, but sometimes this is more difficult than imagined, however after a bit of
left & right turns an Austin 7 was spotted heading in an uphill direction and we
soon came across the hill and the lookout. This hill is the subject of some local
controversy as part of it is a gold mine site and the mine owners want to remove the
whole hill in their operations.
After taking in the view it was off to a collection of Austin Champs, and after not
getting lost we all arrived at this premise for morning tea and housing the largest
collection of Austin Champs in the world. albeit most of them being in a wrecked but
restorable state of affair. This place was amazing with its collection of vehicles.
After morning tea it was off to Seppelts Champagne Cellars at Great Western with
nobody getting lost on the way, because after the tour of the cellars it was lunch
time. The tour of the cellars was most interesting in the way the cellars were
constructed and the way the bottles were stored during their maturation process.
Lunch was served in the cellars together with a few tastings of their bubbly.
The tour in the afternoon was towards the Grampians and as it was said by a 'local'
keep the Grampians on your left and you won't get lost. We didn't get lost but the
road names listed on the run sheet bore no resemblance to the road names on the
sign posts. It was back at the Stawell Motel for the evening meal which again was
excellent. Wayne & Jenny Styles won the Athol Lamont trophy.
Next morning after scraping off the ice from our cars we set off for a reasonably
trouble-free journey home. Thanks to all who attended, next year it's our turn to
host the Border Run. Please don't let us down by not attending.
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Outside the Border Inn at Apsley, just over the border from Naracoorte.
At the top of the hill in Stawell in the crisp Sunday morning sunshine.
Part of the scenery at the Rosevale Homestead and its accoutrements
Austin 7 Journals
Page 23
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Morning tea stop at Rosevale Homestead and small part of collection.
Heading off to the Seppelts Champagne Cellars at Great Western.
Well graded minor roads made it picture postcard territory for an Austin 7 and for the
occasional MG which came into view.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 24
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
In the Seppelts Great Western Cellars.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 25
July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Club Run to Mt Crawford Forest Headquarters.
On Sunday the 15th of June, we met at the Williamstown Hotel car park at 9.15am.
65 adults and 3 children turned up for a 9.30am departure.
This is probably the biggest attendance for a Sunday club run for many, many
years.
We left on time for the forest, just a few club cars, a bit too cold for cars with no
heaters. A lovely looking Morris Minor but fitted with a Datsun motor.
The weather was on the cool side but fairly comfortable for Mt Crawford one of the
coldest spots in the state.
On arrival we parked on the airfield turnaround loading zone for the fire fighting
aircraft. Kevin Haley, our tour leader, introduced us to Tony Lange the officer in
charge of Aircraft loading for region 2 (Tony is an old workmate of mine at Orlando
winery) and the rest of the Aircraft loading team. Tony then explained how they
loaded the planes etc.
At 10am we headed over to the Forestry sheds to look at the big Fireking fire truck.
This truck is fitted out with fire crew safety at the upmost, spray jets are fitted to
spray water over the truck and tyres to stop it catching fire.
It seats a crew of 4 in the cab, but will hold 8 or 9 if needed. The whole truck is clad
in heavy gauge metal some of it 5 or 6mm thick. The windows in the truck are
toughened glass similar to those in your ovens or combustion heaters; as they can
stand a massive heat range.
This truck was one of the older ones from Penola forest; it is about 10 years old. The
cost was about $800,000 the newer ones $1,000,000.
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
PAST EVENTS
Club Run to Mt Crawford Forest Headquarters. Cont:
We then moved back to the airfield. Tony and his crew then demonstrated how they
fill up the aircraft with Kevin playing the part of the plane.
The loading of the plane’s tank, which holds 3,100 litres only takes a couple of
minutes, this includes the retardant, gel or foam.
During the Eden Valley fires last summer, 7 planes and 2 helicopters were on the go
from daylight to dusk. For safety reasons they can not fly at night or in heavy
smoke and if it is too windy. After the display we headed back through
Williamstown to Lyndoch C.F.S. fire station.
About to head off to Lyndoch and the CFS station.
This is a new building, Neville Kies the station chief explained what they do and also
why the trucks have the numbers on their sides e.g. Lyndoch 34, the number 34
means it can carry 3.4 tonnes of water (3400 litres), the same applies for 24 e.g. 2.4
tonnes etc, their third truck is a tanker 13 this carries 13 tonnes (13,000 litres), this
is a supply tanker for all the other units, as it is to big to get close to most of the
fires. Neville also told us that now days they spend more time at house fires and car
crashes than they do grass or bushfires, about 60% to 40%, also backup for S.E.S
and Police in other crisis.
Thanking Neville and his crew, we then headed to Kevin’s home at Sandy Creek,
where poor old (oops) young Lynne was flat out making the salads. The men headed
for Kev’s shed to look at his cars and sheet metal equipment. We then had a
barbecue and salad lunch supplied by Kevin & Lynne. They did a marvellous job
feeding 68 of us. This was followed by scones, jam & cream made by my wife (the
rest of us call her Veronica - ed) & daughter who also made the sausage rolls for
morning tea at Mt Crawford.
Thanks again to Kevin & Lynne for a
wonderful day, to Ralph who sent out
emails to all Club members and thanks to
everyone attending as we raised over
$600 for the Lyndoch CFS and a big
thanks to Beryl for her Big donation.
Bill Gower
PS: Very impressed with the car port
structure at Kevin & Lynne's place, looks
about the right size for between the
Clubrooms and the Library/Toilets - ideal for social events, food for thought. Ed
Austin 7 Journals
Page 27
July 2014
Martin Lewis’s 1946 Austin 16
I’m one of those people who wanted their first car
back again. My first car was a 1948 Austin 16 for
which I paid £50 in 1963. It was a great car and I had
a lot of fun in it. After 3 years and about 45,000 miles
it went to the wreckers.
After my sons finished at uni and were able to
support themselves I started looking for a classic car.
I bought a
1959 FC Holden that was in original
condition and too good to restore. - but I always had
the desire to get another Austin 16. I watched the
papers and car sales magazines, and hunted for 10
years before I found the car I wanted.
Details:
Make/Model:
1946 Austin 16 sedan
Chassis No.
1170
Build Date:
2 April 1946
Engine:
4 cylinder OHV 134 cu. in. (2,199cc)
64 b.h.p. @ 3,800 rpm
Sump capacity: 8 litres
Gearbox:
4 forward 1 reverse gears, synchro on 2,3 & 4. Reversing lamp switch built into
gearbox housing
Body:
4 door, 5 seater, 26cwt (1.3 tonnes)
Turning Circle: 42 feet (12.8 metres) You need a wide road to do a u-turn
Colour:
Metallic Blue (not the original colour, but I suspect it may have been dark blue
originally
Features:
Front bucket seats have armrests; central and side armrests in rear seat; electric
fan blown heater/demister; speedo with odometer and trip meter, clock, oil, amps &
fuel gauges, flip-out trafficators
(they work); under-floor tool box
(under front
passenger seat); originally fitted with Jackall hydraulic jacking system to 4 wheels
(not fitted, but I do have the components - they will come).
The “16” was announced by Austin in 1944, while the war was still on, but manufacture didn’t
commence until the war’s end in 1945. You can see from my chassis number (1170) that it’s a fairly
early car. The body actually came out in 1`939 as an Austin 12, with a 1.5 litre side-valve engine. The
OHV was developed during the war and went into some war-time commercial vehicles, and the “16”
was the first Austin passenger car with an overhead valve motor. The same motor then went into the
A70 in 1948. It was later bored to 2.6 litres and with a couple of carbies it went into the Austin Healey
100 (4).
I have no history on the car prior to 1999 when it was restored by a chap at Warrnambool, Vic. He was
a lecturer in automotive at Warrnambool TAFE and he did a great job on the car. In January 2004 he
sold it to a couple at Inverell, northern NSW, and I bought it from them in July 2011 when she had
early stage Alzheimer's and (in his words) he had “a use-by date of 18 months” because of cancer.
What do I like/dislike about the car? It runs very well, and cruises comfortably at around 55-60 mph.
The engine is very sound and burns minimal oil between changes. I love the big chrome headlights.
While it drives well, the conventional tyres seem to want to wander around the road, so on 2nd class
road surfaces the driver needs to pay attention.
The car attracts a bit of attention when it’s out - there’s not many of them around. I know there’s a
couple of others in the club, and I know of a lovely restored one at Whyalla. But I’ve never seen
another one on the road in the past 10 years (except that there were 2 Victorian 16s in the last Bay to
Birdwood).
I have registered for Austins Over Australia in Devonport Tas next Easter, and I have no concerns
about driving to and from Melbourne in my car.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 28
July 2014
THE RESTORATION OF OUR CAR by Ron & Grace Schache
Our club car is a 1969 Datsun 2000
Roadster.
These cars are known in Australia as
Datsun 2000 Roadsters, but in other
countries they are known as Datsun’
Fairlady’s’; so we have called our car
“My Fairlady Eliza”.
The car was advertised in the Trading
Post in
1992 and I purchased it
totally disassembled and in boxes.
I am a member of the N.S.W. and the
Queensland Datsun Sports Owners
Association.
In 2007 the Australian Nationals for these clubs was held in Tanunda, so we decided
to attend this weekend. It was a great weekend and encouraged me to start the
restoration of the car.
At home we formed a company - our daughter, Tanya, was the project manager,
Grace the Finance Manager and I was Production Manager. The remainder of the
car that was not in boxes was also dismantled so that every nut and bolt and metal
could be cleaned or renewed. I had some of the ’body’ and the chassis sand blasted
by A.Grit Blasters. Tanya stripped most of the paint from the car panels. The
Brakes and clutch cylinders and brake lines were renewed by PBR. The dash-board
was re-vinyled by Dash Original and the Fibreglass hard top was re-vinyled inside
and out by Monaco Auto Trimmers. All other restoration was completed in our
garage and car port.
The car was completed for the Australian Nationals 2013 which was held in Mildura.
Grace and I drove it on its maiden journey and enjoyed every mile. We also joined
the Austin ‘7’ trip to Edithburgh in 2013.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 29
July 2014
CLUB CLASSIFIEDS
Bay to Birdwood
Run and Motorfest
Entries are still open,
see the Club
Noticeboard for
details of a fortnight
of motoring events.
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
Aussie Adventurer Ben Carlin and his Amazing Seep ‘Half Safe’
Ben Carlin was an Australian adventurer who was born in W.A. in 1912. He studied
mining engineering in Perth before accepting a position with a British mining firm in
China in 1939. Carlin married in 1940 (Gertrude Plath) but they had separated by
the end of the war. At the outbreak of war Ben enlisted in Shanghai and was posted
to the Indian Army Corps of Engineers. By war’s end Ben had been promoted to
Major and had also met American volunteer nurse Elinore Arone. On discharge from
the army they emigrated to America and were wed in June 1948.
During the war Carlin had seen the Ford GPA Jeep amphibious vehicle
commonly referred to as a ‘Seep’. (12,778 were built during the war years.) He
suggested to Elinore that they could travel around the world in one of these and
their honeymoon could be spent crossing the Atlantic (sort of like a romantic sea
cruise?) They purchased a 1942 Ford GPA and began modifications to make the
‘Seep’ seaworthy. A more boat like bow, a rudder, enclosed cabin and extra fuel
tanks were fitted. The fuel capacity was now 200 gallons (760 litres). The vessel was
christened ‘Half-Safe’ after a slogan for Arrid, a deodorant - “Don’t be half safe - use
Arrid to be sure”.
The first attempts. The Carlin’s chose Montreal as their starting point and headed
off to New York in late 1947 where the Seep would be ‘launched’. Trial runs were
conducted and eventually the big day arrived on the 16th June 1948 when Half Safe
left New York harbor and headed out into the Atlantic at a speed of 5 knots. The
Carlin’s failed to maintain radio contact so the Coast Guard mounted a search. Half
Safe had landed 40 miles south of New York after being at sea for 5 days. They had
experienced problems with the steering gear. Attempt two left on the 3rd July but
they were again forced back to land following near poisoning following a cracked
exhaust pipe.
In late July attempt three also failed due to mechanical problems and severe
sea sickness. Attempt four took place in early August and this time things went
better. After a few days they were spotted almost 200 miles off shore. But yet again
they lost radio contact and Pan American Airway’s planes were asked to search for
the craft. The craft was sighted
270 miles from land drifting aimlessly. It was
rescued by an oil tanker and returned to America. Seven days into the voyage a
propeller bearing had welded itself fast due to lack of lubrication. The little craft had
then drifted for a further ten days although the Carlin’s did not seem that concerned
as they radioed from the tanker that they were enjoying a pleasant life drifting and
fishing. So after four failed attempts in two months a re-think was necessary as was
the need for more funds. Also winter was approaching so a further attempt was put
on hold.
Here they go again. The Carlin’s had realised they needed to carry more fuel so two
large fuel tanks were made to be towed behind the Seep. September 1949 and off
they go again. 35 miles off shore both fuel tanks were lost (along with the extra fuel
at a considerably financial loss). So back to land again. More modifications and
another large single fuel tank to be towed behind Half Safe was built. Total fuel
capacity was now 735 gallons (up from the initial 200 gallons). 19th July 1950 it’s
off again and this time after 32 days at sea they reach the Azores Islands. But the
‘cruise’ had not been without incident. Ben had to remove the cylinder head several
times to de-carbon the valves. A head gasket also was replaced and the craft lost
radio contact halfway into the trip. They continued to ‘island hop’ and although
planning to land in Portugal decided to carry on and land in Morocco. This they did
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
and finally drove ashore on 25th February 1951. They crossed the Gibraltar Straits
in Mid April before touring Europe and concluding their first part of their round the
world trip in Birmingham where they arrived on 1st January 1952.
Time to rest and recover. Tired and short of funds the decision was made to
remain in England for a while. Considerable repairs were needed as the little craft
had been damaged by Hurricane Charlie near the islands of Macaronesia and the
rough terrain it had travelled. To raise money Half Safe was exhibited in department
stores throughout Europe. During this time Ben Carlin wrote a book ‘Half Safe:
Across the Atlantic by Jeep’. The book sold well (32,000 copies) and was translated
into five languages. April 1955 and the trip is back on. The Carlin’s drive through
Europe and down to Calcutta. They had not originally intended to visit Australia but
the chance to catch up with family and maybe secure more funds saw Half Safe
shipped to Australia for a promotional tour.
From Perth the Carlin’s then drove to Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and
Brisbane. A ship then returned the craft to Calcutta in January 1956. At this time
Ben’s wife had tired of the long travel and constant seasickness and decided to
return home to America (the honeymoon was over?) Although initially continuing on
alone Ben met Hanley Barry, another Australian in Burma and the two teamed up to
continue the journey. The pair drove and ‘sailed’ through Asia finally arriving in
Japan in July 1956. At this point Hanley returned to Australia whilst Ben rested
and carried out more repairs.
The final leg. An American journalist working in Japan, Boye De Mente, offered to
accompany Ben on the final leg of the trip. They left Japan for Alaska on the 1st May
to great fanfare from the Japanese people. They had planned to reach the Aleutian
Island group within the 21 days of their fuel supply. After 21 days no sight of Half
Safe so the Coast Guard were again notified and a search began. The craft was not
sighted until 8th July when they landed at the Aleutian Islands. They had taken a
detour to the town of Petropavlovsk (Russian) where they stayed a while. Another
900 miles sailing before finally arriving in Cold Bay and then Homer. From there
they drove to Anchorage where De Mente flew home to Pheonix. Ben then drove
down to California where he was met by his wife who he had not seen for two years.
From here it was across America then up to Canada where he arrived in Toronto on
the 10th May 1958. Three days later he arrived in Montreal to complete his ten year
journey. He and Half Safe had travelled 11,050 miles (17,780 km) by sea and 38,987
miles (62,744 km) by land over 10 years passing through 38 countries and over two
oceans.
The Guinness World Records recognises Ben Carlin as having completed the “first
and only circumnavigation by an amphibious vehicle”.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 33
July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
High Tech Aerodynamics.
Most of us would have seen on television the extremely complex and intricate wings
and flaps and things on Formula 1 racing cars. Manufacturers spend a small
fortune on wind tunnels to gain that micro second advantage. In the ‘good old days’
things were not that complicated though. I recently read an article about the Monaro
raced by Pete Geoghegan in the mid 1970’s. The car was built by John Sheppard
and he recently detailed how the rear boot lid spoiler shape was achieved. To test
various designs they simply put a mechanic in the boot and drove flat out down the
straights. The mechanic would push up against the boot lid and compare the efforts
needed to lift the boot. More effort equalled more downforce. Pretty simple really and
a really good way to spend your working day.
Sir Jackie Stewart.
One of the most recognisable former racing car drivers would have to be Sir Jackie
Stewart. Known to be the driver who demanded, and got, up-graded safety at race
tracks the world over and a more equitable pay structure for drivers he was not very
clever or articulated as a young man. In fact although he did not know it he was
suffering from dyslexia. He did not know until he was 42 years old that he had this
condition. In an article I read recently he states “I obviously knew I was different in
school. I knew I wasn’t clever. When I married my wife at age 23 I hadn’t the courage
to tell her that I couldn’t read or write or spell”. So from these humble beginnings Sir
Jackie rose to become a much respected man and a man in high demand on the
motivational speaking circuit.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 34
July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
Long, Long Time Ago.
A long, long time ago I raced a car at Brooksfield Dragway (near Two Wells). There
were many strange things about this car. It started its life as a sedate under
powered side valve Ford Prefect of around 1950’s vintage. But it had a heart
transplant in the form of a stove hot Pontiac engine. It also lost a lot of weight to the
point where it was only just a shell of its former self. The firewall was moved back to
where the back of the front seat would normally be and I drove the ‘car’ from the
rear seat position.
But this was not the first rear seat drive car, for excluding the very early
veteran cars, a conventional car was built in 1913 where the driver sat in the rear
seat and peered over the heads of front seat passengers to see where he was going.
The car was the 1913 Duck. It is still debated whether the car was a model of the
Jackson Car Co. or a separate marque built by the Jackson Car Co.. Either way it
was only built in 1913 so I guess it was not that popular.
Jackson was one of fourteen early car manufacturers who built cars in
Jackson, Michigan. They built Jaxon steam cars in 1903 but a falling out between
partners saw the steam division moved on. Jackson entered three cars in the first
Indianapolis race in 1911 where their best placing was 10th.
So what happened to the Ponty Powered Pre. Well after finishing its life as a
wheel standing demonstration and drag racing car the motor was removed and fitted
to an off-road buggy racer. And the original Prefect gracefully rusted away.
Aircraft Safety
Remember the good old days when aircraft terrorism did not exist. I was thinking
about this recently and thought how sad it is that children cannot go into the
cockpit of commercial aircraft these days. As a child me and my friends would spend
a lot of time at Adelaide and Parafield airports.
We rode our bikes miles. At the airports we were free to roam the hangers,
look over the planes and talk to the mechanics. Adelaide airport was always good as
the DC 3’s of Guinea Airways were usually being serviced. (We were all members of
Channel 10’s Junior Flyers Club although I don’t think this made any difference.)
Many a Sunday afternoon was spent looking at the engines and mechanics of
the planes and absorbing as much information as possible. It was only 20 years ago
when I was on a British Airways flight to London (I was off on a speedway trip) when
during a late night stage I asked if I could go up to cockpit. The hostess said it was
o.k. with the captain so I went forward for a while. I was able to stay there for three
hours (until the pilot’s meals came) and during this time I saw many interesting
things. I guess I must have asked reasonably intelligent questions and I was familiar
with some aspects of flying so they let me stay.
Things of interest that I noted were the number of thunderstorms that could
be seen from 36,000 feet (we were flying over India at the time) and the number of
‘strobe’ lights visible from other aircraft in the night sky. Also of interest were the
Austin 7 Journals
Page 35
July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
Indian ground controllers asking if the British airways plane could please speed up
as a Lufthansa Plane behind us was behind schedule. The request was denied as
our plane was meeting expected fuel usage and speeding up would have used more
fuel. So as I lamented earlier how sad is it that now these opportunities no longer
exist.
From Jeeps to Hummers
Back in 1940 Wills-Overland Motors designed and built the first ‘Jeep’.
In 1953 Willys-Overland was bought by Henry J Kaiser and renamed Willys Motors.
In 1960 they won a contract to develop and build half ton delivery vehicles for the
U.S. Post Office. 14,000 were built.
In 1963 Willys Motors was renamed Kaiser Jeep Corporation.
In
1964 Kaiser Jeep Corporation buys the Studebaker Corp. Manufacturing
facilities.
In 1967 Kaiser Jeep Corp. forms a special division to research, develop and produce
Government vehicles.
In 1967 awarded contract by U.S. Post Office for 150,000 ¼ ton DJ-5 Dispatchers.
In 1970 American Motors Corp. buy Kaiser Jeep Corp. from Kaiser Industries.
In 1979 American Motors Corp. Begin design work on the ‘High Mobility, Multi-
purpose, Wheeled Vehicle’. (HMMWV pronounced as Humvee).
In 1981 prototype contract awarded by U.S. Army.
In 1982 development and testing carried out.
In 1982 contract for 55,000 Humvees at 1.2 billion dollars awarded. Order then
increased to 70,000 Humvees at 1.6 billion dollars.
In 1985 production begins on civilian version of Humvees. These are known as
Hummers and are called ‘The World’s Most Serious 4x4’.
In 1989 further contracts gained for another 35,000 Humvees at 1 billion dollars
(order later increased to 50,000).
In
2000 further contracts, through to
2009, for another 65,000 Humvees was
gained.
Over 200,000 Humvees have been built.
They offer exceptional speed, mobility and agility. The multi-purpose platform
accommodates a broad range of configurations. They feature full time four wheel
drive, independent suspension, steep approach and departure angles, 60% grade
ability and 16 inch ground clearance.
Civilian version Hummers have found favour as ‘Custom Cars’ or Stretched Limos’,
but their use as a drive to work or shops car is seriously challenged.
Austin 7 Journals
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July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
Really Scary Speeds
In late May the Indianapolis 500 race was held. The speed of these race cars border
on the insane. During qualifying half the field had a qualifying speed of over or close
to 370 kph. Now these cars are racing not only feet but often inches apart and
considering the wind buffeting at these speeds it is amazing more ’accidents’ do not
occur. But when an accident does happen it occurs for a long time. A car without its
wheels on the ground takes a while to stop, unless it meets an immoveable object.
I enjoy Indy car racing as unlike Formula 1 the winner is rarely predictable.
Any one of the drivers has the chance of winning. All the cars are the same (Dellara
chassis) and there are two factory engine suppliers (Honda and Chevrolet). The
engines are 2.2 litre
(134.3 c.in.) V6 turbo-charged, twin OHC but must have
mechanically operated valves. In fact the pole sitter from this year’s race, Ed
Carpenter, was a driver from his own low budget single car team and the winner,
Ryan Hunter-Raey started the race from the 19th position. Going into the final 10
miles of the race anyone of five drivers still had a very good chance of winning the
race.
Indy cars have tackled safety issues relating to the cars seriously. The cars
have a form of ‘rear bumper’ to stop wheels climbing over each other. The side skirts
have also been extended to behind the front wheels again to prevent wheels from
becoming interlocked. This along with all other safety measures adopted now make
these cars the safest ever but at these speeds fatalities and injuries are still possible.
Another thing I like about Indy car racing is the ‘push to pass’ feature that is
incorporated on the road and street courses. Each driver is given, usually 10, ‘push
to pass’ options. When this option is used the driver gains a slight increase in engine
horse power and engine revs. This adds another strategy into the race, use them
early to gain track position or save them till later to hold off a challenge? This along
with the crew chiefs call as to when to change tyres, and to what option tyre to use,
and the possibility of being ‘caught out’ by caution periods that can occur at any
time make for exciting racing and unpredictable results.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 37
July 2014
Laurie’s page of Stuff. The ramblings of an old man.
Postscript on the Ben Carlin Story
At the conclusion of the trip Half Safe remained in the USA where it was
occasionally exhibited by friend and co-owner George Calimer. Ben, after a period,
returned to Perth taking up residence at Cottesloe. Ben Carlin died in Perth in 1981.
He had left his share of Half Safe to his old school, Guilford Grammar, as well as a
sizeable endowment for the purpose of funding a scholarship. The school purchased
the other share from George Calimer and the craft was transported to Guildford’s
campus where it is on display. The school also posthumously published ‘The Other
Half of Half Safe’ which detailed the second portion of Ben’s journey.
In
1999 the craft was transported across Australia to Corowa, NSW, where it
featured in an annual celebration on the River Murray, along with
16 other
amphibious vehicles from the Second World War.
Money from Carlin’s estate was used to found the Charlotte Carlin Scholarship
(named after his mother), awarded for ‘The proficiency of the English Language with
the Avoidance of Clichés’.
New Wine for Seniors
Clare Valley vintners who produce primarily Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir and Pinot
Grigio wines have developed a new hybrid grape that acts as an anti-diuretic.
It is expected to reduce the number of trips older folk have to make to the bathroom
during the night.
The new wine will be marketed as Pinot More
(I heard it through the grapevine).
Austin 7 Journals
Page 38
July 2014
The A7 Club Day Run on 18 May 2014 from BB's Cafe Mile End Homemaker
Centre to Mt Compass via Kuitpo forest - another Grand Day Out.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 39
July 2014
If undeliverable return to:
Austin 7 Club SA Inc
262 Tapleys Hill Road
POSTAGE
PRINT
SEATON SA 5023
PAID
POST
Austin 7 Journals
PP100000632
AUSTRALIA
George & Pam Keil pose in their Austin 7 at the entrance to Goolwa on our
recent pre war run to the lakeside town.
Austin 7 Journals
Page 40
July 2014