CLUB HISTORY IN BRIEF

In 1953, a group of people, keen to foster motoring activities centred on the Austin Seven motor car, got together and the Austin Seven Club of S.A. was formed. They rebuilt their Austins for road use and at weekends used them in road trials and sprints. After a few years, as the desire to go faster grew, many built special versions of their Sevens – lightweight sports bodies, lowered suspensions and more powerful motors were the way to go. One member, Garrie Cooper, did this and named his cars ‘ELFIN’ and went on to become the largest manufacturer of sports and racing cars in Australia.

Since those early days, the club has grown into one of the larger car clubs in South Australia and our members have been prominent in local and Australian motor sport.

The wheel has turned full circle, as now many of our members are again restoring and rebuilding Austin Sevens as well as other historic motor cars. A book on the first 50 years of the club (1953 – 2003) is available for purchase from the treasurer.  The book is a fascinating read, encompassing many aspects of SA Motoring and Motorsport history. Below is an excerpt from the Book.

At the September 1984 Club general meeting, Mr Bill O’Gorman spoke of the background to the negotiations to getting the AGP for Adelaide and gave the latest news on the design of the circuit. The organisers needed a site that would cause the least disruption to City life: they had considered a layout starting north of the River Torrens, running along King William Street,  over the Albert Bridge near the zoo, Botanic Park and Hackney Road. They also considered Wakefield Street, Pulteney Street and Hindmarsh Square, before taking up the offer to use Victoria Park racecourse. Despite vocal protests from a section of the community opposed to using the area, the pits, grandstands and control buildings were built in the Park, on a new piece of track which linked public roads to created a challenging course.

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